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Photographer Adam Clark tracks the sun

Salt Lake City’s Adam Clark knows that it pays to be patient, even if it takes two weeks to learn how the sun tracks across a certain slope so that he knows his subject will swoop in at the exact right moment.

Photographer Oskar Enander isn’t afraid of the dark

For photographer Oskar Enander, getting the shot is all about timing. If the sun isn’t in the exact spot on the horizon, shadows don’t form in the right places.

Jeff Cricco takes perfect pow shot, everyone quits to go skiing

Getting pitted makes even the grumpiest curmudgeon happy, and when deep powder is combined with cobalt blue skies, it is hard to think of an activity that is more mood-lifting than shredding through an untouched field of snow.

Photographer Zoya Lynch dives in to the ethereal

Zoya Lynch of Revelstoke, B.C. is drawn to the etherial qualities of winter. Sunbursts and halos grace many shots, and her images bring a more conceptual quality to her backcountry photography.

Jason Hummel captures Mt. Baker’s Golden Hour

Bellingham, Wash. resident Jason Hummel spends most of his time in the nearby Cascade and Olympic Mountains, where his love of ski-mountaineering often takes him to the slopes of Mt. Baker. There, he navigates and photographs the long approaches, glaciers, and complex avalanche terrain in hopes of doing this rugged landscape justice.

2017 Photo Annual: Cedric Bernardini

Chamonix, France is a majestic backdrop for any photographer, and Cedric Bernadini is lucky enough to call it home. In this installment from the Photo Annual, he talks about precarious perches he has inhabited to get that perfect steep and deep shot in the Alps.

2017 Photo Annual: Jay Beyer

Jay Beyer, hailing from Salt Lake City, Utah, talks about searching for a unicorn of a shot and what it’s like when the puzzle pieces come together.

Photo Annual 2017: Liam Doran

On a fundamental level, few individuals think both analytically and creatively—left brain, right brain stuff. But photographers are different, their work demanding technical mastery to make art.

Hop to It: Your favorite flower, explained

When brewers talk hops, they’re referring to the flowering cone on the plant Humulus Lupulus, a perennial vine. Hops are dried and added to beers for flavor and stability, and overtime they’ve been cultivated to create a range of tastes. Here’s a rundown of popular U.S. varieties.

Are You Smarter Than a Hipster? Small-scale breweries and their differences

For some, differentiating beers and breweries is an art form with its own brand of terroir and production nuances that affect flavor. But for the rest of us, just knowing the basics is enough, so here is a brief rundown of fermentation facilities and how to tell them apart.

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