Western avalanche death tally rises after two skier fatalities over holiday weekend

In another wave of accidents following multiple slide-related skier deaths in the Western U.S. earlier this month, two avalanches—one in Salt Lake City, Utah’s Electric Lake region on January 18 and another in Aspen, Colo.’s Castle Creek Valley region on January 21—have claimed the lives of two people.

How an East Coast slide proves that avalanches don’t care where you live

Avalanches in Vermont are considered as uncommon as getting the measles. But in March 2018, Vermont residents Aaron Rice, 28, who notably climbed and skied 2.5-million vertical feet in 2016, and friend Cyril Brunner, 27, found themselves dealing with one in Smugglers’ Notch, near Stowe Mountain Resort. The accident wasn’t just because of their line choice and a snowpack with buried facets beneath feet of new snow, but also due to common heuristic traps that can befall skiers anywhere. 

How a little solar gain on Mt. Baker, Wash. led to big consequences

Spring skiing was in full swing on Mt. Baker, Wash. by early last April when photographer Grant Gunderson and his ski partner for the day, Kirsten Rowley, hit a skintrack for Baker’s Shuksan Arm. The duo had spent the previous day at the resort exploring sidecountry zones that had proved to be stable, so they went into the backcountry feeling confident about the snow stability.

Anna Soens reframes the conversation on athletic achievement in the mountains

Anna Soens didn’t expect that she’d become an adaptive role model over the last two and a half years. In December 2015, however, the 30-year-old Boise, Idaho-based wildlife biologist fell 35 feet at a climbing gym, breaking her lowest thoracic vertebra, an injury that left her with partial paralysis from the hips down. As an […]

Ace Kvale: An iconic photographer mentors a new generation

Ace Kvale has been on the forefront of adventure photography for the past 40 years, with subjects ranging from Himalayan peaks to the valleys of his southern Utah home. Kvale, 62, kickstarted his career in the ski industry as an athlete and model before moving behind the lens in the 1980s.

Backcountry Basecamp 2019

BASECAMP 6.0 – Backcountry Magazine teams up with Scott Sports and Nokian Tyres to spread mountain education across the country Jeffersonville, Vt. (for immediate release) – For more than 20 years, Backcountry Magazine has been committed to educating its community on how to safely travel through untracked terrain. And for six years we’ve been taking […]

A Master Bootfitter’s guide to footbeds and liners

We last chatted with Board-certified pedorthist Bob Egeland just before the 2018 Gear Test Week at Powder Mountain to hear about the ABCs of bootfitting. In our conversation, he elaborated on the three key steps to a good AT boot fit: A) The proper shell size; B) Stabilizing the foot with some sort of foot bed; and C) Dealing with all of the padding, poking, punching and grinding.

Fabulous Feet: Master bootfitter Bob Egeland talks about how to approach AT boot fitting

While his profession might leave some feeling a bit squeamish, Bob Egeland, a board-certified Pedorthist, is passionate about keeping people happy in their ski boots all day long. And finding a comfortable fit is his top priority, especially for backcountry skiers who don’t have the option to take a break in the lodge if toes start to tingle.

How one trailbuilder is reshaping access to Vermont’s winter landscape

Hardy Avery has a knack for scoping lines, and it’s a skill that’s established him as one of Vermont’s most sought-after trailbuilders—no matter the season. Avery’s best known work is often of the mountain-biking flavor, with signature trails in Waterbury, Hyde Park and Stowe—including his namesake trail, Hardy’s Haul—drawing visitors from near and afar. In […]

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