U.S. Forest Service Closes All Of New Hampshire’s Tuckerman Ravine, Huntington Ravine and Gulf of Slides

Announced today, the U.S. Forest Service has closed all Forest Service land within the Cutler River Drainage of New Hampshire’s Presidential Range. This closure affects the entirety of the classic spring-skiing terrain of Tuckerman Ravine and Hillman’s Highway, as well as Huntington Ravine and Gulf of Slides. The unprecedented action expands on Monday’s closure of the Headwall section of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail and was enacted in response to safety concerns related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Utah Avalanche Center reports 11 human-triggered avalanche incidents in three-day window, urges users to make more conservative decisions

In response to these accidents, and in light of resort closures and the strain being placed on the healthcare system by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Utah Avalanche Center (UAC) is urging backcountry users to make more conservative decisions in the mountains.

Points of Contrast: in the mountains, everything has an equal and opposite

After two hours of climbing steadily uphill, we pause on the ridgeline. All is quiet—no labored breathing, no squeak of bindings or whoosh of pant legs passing, no sifting of snow sliding into the cut bank of the skintrack. The air is still, and neither a tree bow bends nor a bird or squirrel moves through the forest.

After 20 years, Patagonia’s R1 celebrates its tenure as the ultimate layer

Patagonia R1 Fleece Pullover Hoody and Tech Hoody$159 and $169 | patagonia.com It’s the mid ’90s, and PolarFleece is everywhere. The soft, high-pile knit made from recycled polyester and invented in 1981 by Polartec has become as ubiquitous in outdoor clothing as zippers. My father would buy it by the bolt from Malden Mills, Polartec’s […]

With the TLT8, Dynafit brings major updates to its game-changing line

Game-changing is a loathsome term around the Backcountry office. That’s because it generally tends to be thrown around with enough frequency when talking about gear to become meaningless, hence its blacklist-adjacent status.

Backcountry.com battles small businesses over trademark, apologizes. Backcountry Magazine remains unaffected.

Before winter has really even kicked into gear across the U.S., the word backcountry is already making major headlines. But not because of news of avalanches, access issues or tension beyond boundaries. Earlier this week, the Colorado Sun reported that online retail giant Backcountry.com is suing a handful of small businesses over a trademark of […]

Fanfare: Scott and Alpride take the avalanche airbag to a futuristic level

The inner workings of Scott’s new supercapacitor-powered avalanche airbag sound like something out of Back to the Future. And while the Backcountry Patrol AP 30 doesn’t have the time-travel capabilities of Dr. Emmett Brown’s DeLorean (thanks to its flux capacitor), this pack is more travel-capable than many airbags.

Tom Murphy, Karl Klassen & Jean Pavillard: American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE) Founders

Today, the acronym AIARE (“airy”) is practically a proprietary eponym—like Kleenex or Spandex—for an avalanche courses. Less than two decades ago, however, there was very little that was standard in American avalanche education. Tom Murphy, Karl Klassen and Jean Pavillard would change that.

Montgomery Atwater: Father of U.S. Avalanche Work

Early in life, Montgomery Atwater’s aspirations weren’t to work with snow and avalanches. In fact, after graduating from Harvard in 1926 with a degree in English literature, the Oregon native began writing works of nonfiction. But World War II brought Atwater, who went by the nickname Monty, to Colorado’s Camp Hale where he’d join the 10th Mountain Division.

The Battles for Bear Creek

Four years ago, when I dropped into the San Joaquin Couloir beyond Telluride Ski Resort in the upper Bear Creek drainage, the greatest challenge before me lay the firm, moguled surface of the thinly-covered, shale-walled chute.

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